Sunday, October 08, 2017

Links & Reviews

- The "Bibliography Among the Disciplines" conference is coming up this week! Looking forward to seeing many of you there.

- Colleen Barrett of PRB&M gets the "Bright Young Booksellers" spotlight this week.

- At The Collation, Erin Blake explains this month's caption-contest Crocodile post.

- Trinity College Dublin is digitizing eight important medieval manuscripts as part of the "Beyond the Book of Kells" lecture series.

- The Yale Daily News reports that the Jonathan Edwards papers formerly held at the Andover Newton Theological Seminary will now join the other Edwards papers at the Beinecke.

- Quite an impressive showing at Swann this week for their Printed & Manuscript Americana sale!

Reviews

- Ron Chernow's Grant; review by T.J. Stiles in the WaPo.

- Robin Sloan's Sourdough; review by Jeff VanderMeer in the LATimes.

- James Atlas' The Shadow in the Garden; review by Jeffrey Meyers in the LATimes.

Upcoming Auctions

- Bibliothèque Romantique R. & B. L. at Sotheby's Paris on 10 October.

- Rare Books, Manuscripts, Maps & Photography at Lyon & Turnbull on 11 October.

- Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books at Swann Galleries on 17 October.

- The Marine Sale at Bonhams London on 18 October.

- The Richard Beagle Collection of Angling & Sporting Books, Part II. With Americana, Travel & Exploration, Cartography at PBA Galleries on 19 October.

- Books and Works on Paper at Bloomsbury Auctions on 19 October.

- Historical Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions on 19 October.

Sunday, October 01, 2017

Links & Reviews

- From Sarah Werner, "book history questions and digital facsimiles."

- Former Lilly Librarian William Cagle died this week at the age of 83. Joel Silver has an "In Memoriam" post on the Lilly's blog.

- Among the Rare Book Monthly articles for October, Michael Stillman reports on the end of California's controversial autographed memorabilia law as it pertains to booksellers, Susan Halas profiles Nancy Pearl, and Michael Stillman covers a recent AbeBooks downtime.

- Rich Rennicks highlights a national scavenger hunt in Ireland for copies of Bill Drummond's The Curfew Tower is Many Things which have been hidden in each of the 32 counties in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

- The National Library of Ireland announced a series of major Yeats-related acquisitions. More from RTÉ.

- Emory University has acquired the "Joan Anderson letter," sent from Neal Cassady to Jack Kerouac and credited as the inspiration for On the Road.

- Betsy Walsh, head of reader services at the Folger Shakespeare Library, passed away on 22 September. There is a memorial post up at The Collation.

- An early Hemingway story (perhaps his first) was recently identified in a collection of material owned by the Bruce family, longtime Hemingway friends.

Reviews

- Stephen Taylor's Defiance; review by Lauren Elkin in the NYTimes.

- Jonathan Cott's There's a Mystery There; review by Jerry Griswold in the WaPo.

- Edward St. Aubyn's Dunbar; review by Bethanne Patrick in the LATimes.

- Maja Lunde's The History of Bees; review by Ellie Robins in the LATimes.

- Several recent books on Montaigne; review by Patrick J. Murray in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 4 October.

- Fine Literature, Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror at PBA Galleries on 5 October.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Links & Reviews

Lots to catch up on; I took some time away from the computer for a while so I'm sure I've missed a few things here - feel free to send them along.

- The LDS Church has paid $35 million for the printer's manuscript copy of the Book of Mormon.

- From the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog, "How many copies of Birds of America does a family need?" and "Havell's Copper."

- At The Collation, "Consuming the New World."

- From Rachael Herrmann at The Junto, "How not to write your first book."

- The BL is asking for crowdsourcing help with its 19th-century playbills.

- Sandra L. Brooke has been appointed Avery Director of the Library at the Huntington Library.

- The winner's of this year's National Collegiate Book Collecting Competition and the inaugural Honey & Wax Book Collecting Prize have been announced.

- From the Village Voice, "Keepers of the Secrets."

- The AAS has launched an illustrated inventory of their watch paper collection.

- A first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone sold for $81,000.

- John Crichton will deliver the inaugural Kenneth Karmiole Endowed Lecture on the History of the Book Trade in California and the West at the Book Club of California on 30 October.

- From Erin Schreiner at JHIBlog, "You Should Learn Descriptive Bibliography."

- In the TLS, Dimitra Fimi asks "Why build new worlds?"

- Now on display at Yale's Beinecke Library, "Making the Medieval English Manuscript."

- Another Voynich Manuscript "solution" has been proposed.

- Jonathan Senchyne's identification of a George Moses Horton essay at the NYPL is featured in the NYTimes.

- From Jot101, "Fakery, forgery and the fore-edge painter."

- At American Book Collecting, "Book Hunter Bypaths Explored & Exposed."

- The OUP Blog has an excerpt from Kevin Hayes' new book George Washington: A Life in Books.

- Prince Rupert's Drops are the order of the day at The Collation.

- The Library of Congress' collection of James K. Polk papers are now available online.

- The Junto has a Q&A with Coll Thrush about his new book Indigenous London.

- Over at Notes from Under Grounds, a look at early UVA library shelfmarks.

- Emily Yankowitz writes for JHIBlog on "William Plumer and the Politics of History Writing."

Reviews

- A new film on the NYPL, "Ex Libris"; review by Jordan Hoffman in the Guardian.

- Michael Sims' Frankenstein Dreams; review by Genevieve Valentine for NPR.

- Walter Stahr's Stanton; review by David Holahan for the CSM.

- Coll Thrush's Indigenous London; review by Sara Georgini at The Junto.

Upcoming Auctions

- Fine Books and Manuscripts Featuring Exploration & Travel at Bonhams New York on 26 September.

- The Vivien Leigh Collection at Sotheby's London on 26 September.

- The Library of John and Suzanne Bonham at Sotheby's London on 26 September.

- The Yeats Family Collection at Sotheby's London on 27 September.

- Printed and Manuscript Americana at Swann Galleries on 28 September.

Sunday, September 03, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Rare Book School scholarship and fellowship applications are now available, with a due date of 1 November.

- The Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair is coming up on 8–10 September. Purchase of an opening night preview ticket benefits the RBS Scholarship Fund. Hope to see some of you there!

- Scans of the Library of Congress' collection of Alexander Hamilton papers are now available online.

- A hard drive containing unpublished works by Terry Pratchett was destroyed by steam roller this week, per the author's wishes.

- Ithaka S+R and the Mellon Foundation have released a report on employee diversity in ARL libraries.

- Jeanette Lerman writes on the current LCP exhibition "The Living Book" for the Philadelphia Inquirer, highlighting the (utterly wonderful) leaf books of Joseph Breintnall.

- David Fuchs talked on "Morning Edition" this week about Walter and Graham Judd's Flora of Middle Earth.

- Miriam Katazawi reports in for the Globe and Mail from an ongoing inventory at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.

- Books from Vivien Leigh's library will go on the auction block on 26 September at Sotheby's London.

Reviews

- Two Walt Whitman texts recently identified and edited by Zachary Turpin; review by Ted Genoways in the NYTimes.

- David Williams' When the English Fall; review by Abigail Deutsch in the NYTimes.

- Lawrence P. Jackson's Chester B. Himes: A Biography; review by Robert B. Stepto in the WaPo.

- Helen Pilcher's Bring Back the King and Ursula K. Heise's Imagining Extinction; review by Colin Dickey in the LARB.

- Carol Berkin's A Sovereign People; review by Monica Rico in the LARB.

Upcoming Auctions

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 6 September.

- Rare Books & Manuscripts, with the Fred Bennett Collection of the Book Club of California at PBA Galleries on 7 September.

- Eric C. Caren – How History Unfolds on Paper at Cowan's Auctions on 8 September.

- Books and Ephemera at National Book Auctions on 9 September.

- Fine Books and Manuscripts at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers on 13 September.

- Books at Heritage Auctions on 14 September.

- The Glory of Science at Bloomsbury on 14 September.

- Rare Cartography – Americana – Travel & Exploration at PBA Galleries on 21 September.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Links & Reviews

- An important early Latin commentary on the Gospels has been identified in the Cologne Cathedral Library and translated into English for the first time.

- A copy of the Columbus Letter stolen from the Vatican Library and replaced with a fake has been located and returned.

- A fire in the southern Italian city of Cosenza has reportedly destroyed a private museum "housing the collection of the Bilotti Ruggi D'aragona family, described as "the most important library in southern Italy."

- On the Library of Congress blog, a Q&A with aspiring book conservator Riley Thomas.

- Over at Past is Present, "Collaborative Bibliographic Data Production," by Nigel Lepianka and "Unpacking a Digital Library" by Adam Fales.

- The Boston Globe reports on the identification and recent production of a 17th-century play, the manuscript of which was found in the BPL's collections.

- Vanderbilt has acquired the George Clulow and United States Playing Card Co. Gaming Collection.

- The "I am Jack the Ripper" postcard will be offered at auction in October.

Reviews

- John Clayton's Wonderlandscape; review by Dennis Drabelle in the WaPo.

- Laurent Binet's The Seventh Function of Language; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

- James Delbourgo's Collecting the World; review by John Gallagher in the Irish Times.

Upcoming Auction

- Fine Books in All Fields at PBA Galleries on 31 August.

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Over at American Book Collecting, a transcription of an unpublished account of antiquarian bookselling in the early 1880s by Isaac Mendoza, plus some background info. Very much worth a read, and many thanks to Kurt for posting it.

- Cécilia Duminuco posts for the Cambridge University Library Special Collections Blog on "Conserving Darwin's Library and its curiosities."

- Some early illustrated editions of Robinson Crusoe are highlighted on the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog.

- One theft report from the ABAA to pass along.

- An urgent appeal has been launched to save John Milton's cottage.

- Benjamin Park talks to Carla Gardina Pestana about her new book The English Conquest of Jamaica at The Junto.

- The APHA blog posts a query about print industry statistics; if you can help the researcher, please do.

- Pegasus Books has published Bibliomysteries, a collection of commissioned original stories edited by Otto Penzler.

- There's a lovely "In Memoriam" post on the ABAA blog for bookseller Jack Hanrahan.

- On the LC blog, "A Different Sense of Thomas Jefferson's Library."

- Susan Halpert writes about "A Curious Manuscript" for the Houghton Library Blog.

- David Barnett writes for the Independent about the upcoming sale of the KoKo collection at Heritage Auctions.

Reviews

- Carla Gardina Pestana's The English Conquest of Jamaica; review by Casey Schmitt at The Junto.

- Rebecca Romney and J.P. Romney's Printer's Error; review by John Paul at popmatters.

- Margaret Willes' The Curious World of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn; review by Frances Wilson in the Spectator.

- Walter Stahr's Stanton; review by Thomas Mallon in the NYTimes.

- Mattias Boström's From Holmes to Sherlock; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Miniature Books: The Library of a Gentleman Collector at PBA Galleries on 24 August.

- Rare Books, Manuscripts & Ephemera at Addison & Sarova on 26 August.

Sunday, August 06, 2017

Links & Reviews

- The lineup for the 2018 Melbourne Australasian Rare Books School is now available.

- More from the "Discovering Lost Manuscripts" project at Echoes from the Vault.

- Terry Seymour seeks assistance with a census of the first edition of Boswell's Life of Johnson.

- The Willison Foundation Charitable Trust is offering grants of up to £4,000 for research on topics related to book history and bibliography.

- The NEH announced $39.3 million in grants for 245 humanities projects this week.

- Julie Mellby has a series of posts on the Princeton Graphic Arts blog about her time in Richard Ovenden's RBS course last week.

- E.B. White's Maine farm is up for sale. Anybody got $3.7 million?

- Christie's profiles their head librarian, Lynda McLeod.

- Over on the Lilly Library blog, LIS student Rachel Makarowski writes about the 1616 folio edition of Ben Jonson's works.

- Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden is featured in the NYTRB "By the Book" column.

- Katherine Mansfield's first known story has been identified at Wellington (NZ) City Library.

- New from OCLC Research, "The Transformation of Academic Library Collecting."

Reviews

- Cass Sunstein's #republic; review by David Weinberger in the LARB.

- Eric Kurlander's Hitler's Monsters; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

- Terry Burrows' The Art of Sound; review by Michael Lindgren in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auction

- Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Cartography at PBA Galleries on 10 August.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Links & Reviews

- In Science, "Goats, bookworms, a monk's kiss: Biologists reveal the hidden history of ancient gospels."

- Alison Flood and Sian Cain report on "the strange world of book thefts" for the Guardian.

- Julie Miller posts for the LOC blog about a recent acquisition: the 1783 petition from loyalist Isaac Low to the Loyalist Claims Commission.

- Over at JHIBlog, Spencer Weinreich on the "forgotten partnership" between Houdini and Lovecraft.

- "A Possible Keats" from Fleur Jaeggy in the TLS.

- Phyllis Richardson writes for the Guardian on the "real buildings behind fictional houses."

- Liz Adams notes a neat provenance example from the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke.

- Some finds from the backlog are highlighted over at Echoes from the Vault.

- Historian Thomas Fleming died this week at the age of 90. NYTimes obituary.

- Over at Motherboard, "Why is the Internet Archive Painstakingly Preserving One Man's Junk Mail?"

- Lynne Thomas has been appointed head of the University of Illinois Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Reviews

- David Waldstreicher's new Library of America edition of the diaries of John Quincy Adams; review by Richard Brookhiser in the WSJ.

- Peter Parker's Housman Country; review by Alan Riding in the NYTimes.

- David Williams' When the English Fall; review by Swapna Krishna in the LATimes.

Looks like a quiet auction week.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Theft alert: four signed books were stolen from Bloomington, IN.

- The AHA posted a quick update on congressional budget actions taken last week regarding cultural heritage programs. It's good news so far, but we must keep the pressure on.

- Preview tickets for this year's Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair (8–10 September) are now available; this year proceeds from the preview will benefit the Rare Book School Scholarship fund.

- The Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog highlights a new edition of Swift's A Modest Proposal.

- From the same blog, a short piece about William Earl Dodge and the preservation of some of Audubon's bird plates.

- Susan Falciani profiles book thief James Richard Shinn for Atlas Obscura.

- A new "fused imaging" technique developed at Northwestern University may be useful for reading fragments hidden inside bookbindings.

- Over at Lux Mentis, Booksellers, Ian Kahn posts about an absolutely awesome new acquisition: a record player, albums, and technical specs from the Library of Congress' Talking Books project. He's shared lots of pictures too - have a look!

- Erin Blake writes about her time at Rare Book School at The Collation: "I learned to read Secretary Hand!!!! (And so can you)"

- Janice Hansen writes for the Chapel Hill Rare Book Blog about a recent find in the stacks.

- Duke has acquired a volume from Thomas Jefferson's library that also happened to be owned later by William Howard Taft.

- Ian Sansom rereads Jane Austen for the TLS.

Reviews

- Robert Thake's A Publishing History of a Prohibited Best-Seller; review by David Coward in the TLS.

- Francis Spufford's Golden Hill; review by Karen Heller in the WaPo.

- Adam Begley's The Great Nadar; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Fine Literature & Fine Books at PBA Galleries on 27 July.

- Rare Books and Works on Paper at Bloomsbury on 27 July.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Links & Reviews

- A very happy anniversary to Tavistock Books, celebrating twenty years on Saturday! They've posted a Q&A with Vic Zoschak to mark the occasion.

- From Scientific American, "Peering beneath the Surface of Ancient Manuscripts."

- A €10 million redevelopment plan has been announced by the National Library of Ireland.

- Roger Gaskell and Erin Schreiner write about the new replica 18th-century rolling press at Rare Book School at JHIBlog.

- From Aaron Pratt at Cultural Compass (the HRC blog), "Instructions for reading aloud in the Gutenberg Bible."

- The Watkinson Library at Trinity College has acquired the personal library of Trinity alumnus Charles Hayden Proctor, kept intact since Proctor's death in 1890.

- Nate Pedersen talks to Edwin D. Rose for the FB&C "Bright Young Collectors" series.

- ABAA posted an alert about a missing book in San Francisco.

- Willamette Week highlights The Brautigan Library.

- The MHS has acquired Col. Robert Gould Shaw's Civil War sword, which recently turned up in a Shaw family home.

- At the Peter Harrington blog, "The Book Huntresses: Women Bibliophiles."

- Katy Lasdow talks to Alea Henle for the Junto's "Where Historians Work" series.

- There's a fascinating update on the Discovering Lost Manuscripts Project at the University of St. Andrews.

- A new exhibition at Marsh's Library highlights the stories of books stolen from the library since its founding.

- Biblio and Rare Book Hub are partnering to allow Hub subscribers to sell directly through the site using Biblio's search and e-commerce systems.

- Sarah Hovde posts at The Collation about some tricky Shakespearean "novelettes."

- Book collector Sir Sydney Carlyle Cockerell is featured as the ONDB "Life of the Week."

- Over at Steamboats Are Ruining Everything, Caleb Crain offers "A Longitudinal study of self-presentation on the interwebs."

- Biographer Kenneth Silverman died this week; see the NYTimes obituary.

- The ABAA blog reposts Richard Norman's "History of Vellum and Parchment."

- Book collector John Mellman has posted a "History and Personal Assessment" of the Harper Torchbooks series at Publishing History.

- I've begun playing around with Tropy, a new software program for research photo management from CHNM. Still in beta, but it looks really promising so far! [h/t Mitch Fraas]

Book Reviews

- The Card Catalog; review by Michael Lindgren in the WaPo.

- Lucy Worsley's Jane Austen at Home; review by Amy Bloom in the NYTimes.

- Helen Kelly's Jane Austen: The Secret Radical; review by John Sutherland in the NYTimes.

- Fred Kaplan's Lincoln and the Abolitionists; review by Manisha Sinha in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 19 July.

- Children's & Illustrated Books at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 20 July.

- Space Exploration at Sotheby's New York on 20 July.

Sunday, July 09, 2017

Links & Reviews

- From Vayos Liapis at the OUP blog: "The real thing: the thrills of inauthentic literature."

- Erin Blake writes for The Collation about an ~1857 photographic facsimile, one of the first made of an entire book.

- A walking stick once owned by Sir Walter Scott will be on the auction block this week.

- The Godmersham Lost Sheep Society is on the hunt for books containing the bookplate(s) of Montagu George Knight.

- The first issue of Thresholds, a new "experiment in digital publishing," is out.

- A crowdfunding effort is underway to digitize and make available the slide collection of Christopher Clarkson.

- Danuta Kean reports for the Guardian on the latest Voynich Manuscript theory.

- Echoes from the Vault marked the 330th anniversary of the publication of Newton's Principia.

- The Library of Congress has posted video of an April talk by Wayne Wiegand, "How Long, O Lord, Do We Roam in the Wilderness? A History of School Librarianship."

- From FB&C, "The Lost Libraries of London," by A. N. Devers.

- An 1812 Jane Austen letter parodying a recent novel will be sold at auction this week.

- Mississippi State University has acquired a large collection related to Lincoln and the Civil War.

- The JTA highlights Amsterdam's Livraria Ets Haim, described as "the world's oldest functioning Jewish library."

- Some recent finds from a study of Cornell's illuminated manuscripts using XRF technology are featured in the Cornell Chronicle.

- New from the Massachusetts Historical Society, and freely available as an e-book, "The Future of History."

- Also from MHS, a new fundraising campaign to support transcription and digitization of John Quincy Adams' diaries.

- From the NYTimes Upshot blog, "The Word Choices That Explain Why Jane Austen Endures."

- Over on the Scholars' Lab blog, James Ascher posts on "Transcribing Typography with Markdown."

- Forgot this last week: a photo claimed to be of Jesse James has surfaced, and will be sold at auction on August.

Reviews

- William Hogeland's Autumn of the Black Snake; review by Tom Cutterham at The Junto.

- Rebecca Brannon's From Revolution to Revolution; review by Christopher Minty at The Junto.

- Abigail Williams' The Social Life of Books; review by Ernest Hilbert in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- English Literature, History, Children's Books and Illustrations, including The Garrett Herman Collection: The Age of Darwin at Sotheby's London on 11 July.

- Valuable Books and Manuscripts at Christie's London on 12 July.

- Art & Illustration - Fine Children's Literature at PBA Galleries on 13 July.

Sunday, July 02, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Catherine Allgor has been appointed the next president of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

- David Whitesell posts at Notes from Under Grounds about a major new acquisition.

- The Junto has a Q&A with David Gary of the American Philosophical Society as part of their "Where Historians Work" series.

- Tess Goodman writes for JHIBlog on "The Idea of the Souvenir: Mauchline Ware."

- Common-place has a new issue up, with thirteen emerging scholars introducing pre-1800 American texts.

- Also at JHIBlog, Yitzchak Schwartz has a review of this year's Manfred R. Lehman Workshop on the History of the Hebrew Book in "Towards a History of Hebrew Book Collecting."

- There's a great deal in the July Rare Book Monthly: Bruce McKinney on quite an interesting Revolutionary War collection, Thibaut Ehrengardt on an "untouched collection" in Belgium, and Eric Caren on the 15 June Christie's sale of important items from his collection.

- Over at Past is Present, "The Practice of Everyday Cataloging: 'Blacks as Authors' and the Early American Bibliographic Record."

- Mary Beard's "Learning to be a librarian" made me laugh out loud at least twice.

- Paul Grondahl reports on a recent eBay find of an Albany County judicial ledger; the story has a connection to the Daniel Lorello archives thefts from several years ago.

- The Sion College Library Provenance Project has been relaunched.

- APHA is now "accepting short articles on lesser known aspects of the history of printing and related arts and crafts, including calligraphy, typefounding, typography, papermaking, bookbinding, illustration, and publishing" for publication on the APHA website.

Reviews

- Charlie English's The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu; review by William Dalrymple in the Guardian.

- Sarah Williams' Damnable Practises; review by Penelope Gouk at H-Net Reviews.

- Ronald White's American Ulysses; review by Chris Fobare at H-Net Reviews.

Upcoming Auctions

- Western & Oriental Manuscripts and Miniatures at Drewatts & Bloomsbury on 6 July.

- Fine Books & Manuscripts at Potter & Potter on 8 July.

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Links & Reviews

Seemed like a quiet week - you'd think there was a major conference or something going on ... thanks to all who tweeted from #RBMS17; it was nice to follow along from afar!

I begin with a request: I'd like to get a copy of Henry Morris' 1999 spoof Booblio; if any bookseller out there has one in an ephemera bin (I don't find any copies currently online), please let me know.

- A fun look at the iconography of the Pickwick Papers as found in the Dickens collection of Samuel William Meek on the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog.

- The JHIBlog contributors give us a look at their summer reading lists.

- Houghton Library's accession books from 1941 to 1983 have been digitized.

- Glenn Fleishmann writes for Wired on "How Letterpress Printing Came Back from the Dead."

- Not all that much new here, but Danuta Kean highlights famous misprints for the Guardian.

- Chris Phillips writes about his recent Rare Book School course at Criticism by Other Means.

Book Reviews

- Frank Felsentein and James J. Connolly's What Middletown Read; review by Cassie Brand on H-Net Reviews.

- Alicia Brazeau's Circulating Literacy; review by Richard Mikulski on H-Net Reviews.

- Fred Kaplan's Lincoln and the Abolitionists; review by Eric Foner in the NYTimes.

- Edward Dolnick's The Seeds of Life; review by Abraham Verghese in the NYTimes.

- The Australian National Dictionary; review by Barry Humphries in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- La bibliothèque de Pierre Bergé - Musique et Poésie at Sotheby's Paris on 28 June.

The Erotica Sale at Bloomsbury on 29 June.

- Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Cartography at PBA Galleries on 29 June.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Rebecca Fishbein offers "A Brief History of the Strand," founded ninety years ago this year.

- David Laskin writes for the NYTimes Travel section on "The Hidden Treasures in Italian Libraries."

- A nicely illustrated 1819 ship's log sold at Swann last week for $20,800.

- Keith Houston highlights a new punctuation mark ("a Dutch interrobang") and interviews the typographer behind it.

- Tawrin Baker writes for the Huntington's blog on "Visualizing the Anatomy of the Eye."

- Maggs Bros. new shop gets the Architectural Digest treatment.

- Over at Past is Present, an interview with Chris Phillips about his research at AAS.

- Edward Whitley asks "Where did Leaves of Grass come from?"

- On 15 July, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a "Transcribe-a-thon" to mark John Quincy Adams' 250th birthday.

- The Chicago Tribune reports on the upcoming $11 million renovation at the Newberry Library.

- Ellen G.K. Rubin's collection of movable books is featured in Atlas Obscura.

- Ian Ehling has been appointed Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts at Bonhams New York.

- Bookseller Garrett Scott offers up a really fascinating probate inventory featuring a detailed library list.

- In the TLS, Stuart Kelly on "Writing beyond the grave."

- If you have bought from or sold to ebay user davius-9srhw8rb, please contact the ABAA.

Reviews

- Yael Rice reviews the Sackler Gallery's recent exhibition "The Art of the Qu'ran" in the LARB.

- Erica Benner's Be Like the Fox; review by Edmund Fawcett in the NYTimes.

- Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art; review by Michael Hofmann in the NYTimes.

- Joe Berkowitz's Away with Words; review by Allan Fallow in the WaPo.

- The British Museum's exhibition and catalog on Hokusai; review by Peter Maber in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Books, Autographs and Works at Paper at Bloomsbury on 22 June.

- Fine Judaica at Kestenbaum and Company on 22 June.

- Books and Ephemera at National Book Auctions on 24 June.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Two notices from the ABAA about missing/stolen books: a copy of the first English edition of Melville's The Confidence Man, and an original photo album of the construction of the Madeira-Mamore Railroad.

- Rebecca Rego Barry highlights some key lots from the 15 June Christie's sale of the ornithological library of Dr. Gerald Dorros.

- NPR ran a story this week about Lovecraft-inspired board games.

- From Heather Wolfe at The Collation, "Imagining a lost set of common-place books."

- At Libraria, a report about recent research which has revealed forty sealskin binding over-covers on manuscripts from the library of Clairvaux Abbey, with indications that the practice may have been even more widespread in the collection.

- Over at the Princeton Graphic Arts Collection blog, "The Shakespeare that almost didn't happen."

- Rare Books Digest takes a look at the Vinegar Bible.

- Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney write for the TLS about the long-distance friendship between Harriet Beecher Stowe and George Eliot.

Book Reviews

- Sarah Perry's The Essex Serpent; review by Ron Charles in the WaPo.

- Mike Rapport's The Unruly City; review by Russell Shorto in the NYTimes.

Upcoming Auctions

- Art, Press & Illustrated Books at Swann Galleries on 13 June.

- Fine Books & Manuscripts, Including Americana at Sotheby's New York on 13 June.

- Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs at Bonhams London on 14 June.

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winter Auctioneers on 14 June.

- The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana and the Eric C. Caren Collection at Christie's New York on 15 June.

- Rare Books & Manuscripts at PBA Galleries on 15 June.

- Books & Manuscripts at Freeman's on 16 June.

Sunday, June 04, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Registration is now open for a very interesting-looking conference this September, "BH and DH: Book History and Digital Humanities."

- Over at Past is Present, a new list of recent articles and books published by members of the AAS community.

- The National Library of Norway is planning to digitize works from the collections of Nigeria's National Library published in the Hausa, Igbo, and Yoruba languages.

- At recto | verso, a look at American documentary photography around the turn of the twentieth century.

- A report in the Telegraph suggests that Italian authorities have recently unraveled an art and book theft ring in the Turin area; one manuscript was found to have been stolen from the Royal Library of Turin in 2012. If anybody has more information about this story, I'd love to see it.

- Melbourne Rare Book Week begins on 30 June this year.

- Mary McClure posts at Echoes from the Vault about a lovely Book of Hours from the St Andrews collections.

- June's Rare Book Monthly articles include an update on the California law about the sale of autographed materials, and a report from Michael Stillman on the theft of an RAF logbook.

- Boston 1775 explores Isaiah Thomas' involvement with an American edition of Fanny Hill.

- Natasha Pizzey writes for the BBC about the Luis de Carvajal manuscript recently returned to Mexico.

- Danuta Kean reports for the Guardian about the sale of the library of William O'Brien, coming up this week at Sotheby's.

Book Reviews

- Anthony Horowitz's Magpie Murders; review by Charles Finch in the WaPo.

- Max Décharné's Vulgar Tongues; review by Allan Fallow in the WaPo.

Upcoming Auctions

- Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books at Swann Galleries on 7 June.

- The Library of William O'Brien: Property of the Milltown Park Charitable Trust at Sotheby's London on 7 June.

- Fine Books and Manuscripts, including Illustration Art at Bonhams New York on 7 June.


Sunday, May 28, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Two theft notices from the ABAA: a Thomas Jefferson autograph note and a 1610 folio volume, A Display of Heraldry.

- NEH Chairman William Adams resigned from his post last week. The agency is targeted for elimination under the president's FY18 budget (call your representatives). See their FAQ on where things go from here.

- On the proposed budget cuts (which reach far beyond NEH), see Bethany Nowviskie's post to a Digital Library Federation list.

- Alcoholics Anonymous has filed suit for the return of the printers' copy of the organization's "Big Book," scheduled to be sold at auction on 8 June by Profiles in History. The annotated typescript was previously sold at auction in 2004 and 2007.

- Honey & Wax Booksellers have announced a new book-collecting prize open to women book collectors in the U.S. under 30 years old.

- Aaron Pratt has been appointed the new Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts at the Harry Ransom Center.

- Carla Giaimo writes for Atlas Obscura on "The Lost Typefaces of W.A. Dwiggins."

- Rob Rulon-Miller provides an overview of this summer's Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar.

- Elizabeth Savage posted a new update to her census of early modern frisket sheets (project homepage) and has a post at The Conveyor about a recent related find.

- Rare Book School's summer lecture schedule is out.

-Book curses on the BL's medieval manuscripts blog.

- Kate Mitas has begun a series on archival cataloging for booksellers.

- A new exhibition at the National Library of New Zealand, He Tohu, highlights three important founding documents in the country's history.

- From James Ascher on the UVA Scholars' Lab blog, "Visualizing Paper Evidence Using Digital Reproductions."

- At Echoes from the Vault, a look at some interesting finds from the St Andrews Burgh records.

- Mary Bendel-Simso talked to The Academic Minute about her work using digital newspaper archives to find early American detective fiction.

- At Notes from Under Grounds, Nora Benedict Frye posts about her current UVA Special Collections exhibition on Borges and bibliography.

- Rebecca Mead reports on the recent identification of a "lost" Edith Wharton play.

- Will Gore writes for the Spectator on "Why rare books are thriving in the digital age."

- Danuta Kean reports for the Guardian about Peter Steinberg and Gail Crowther's recent identification of unpublished Sylvia Plath poems found by examining a sheet of carbon paper in Plath's papers at the Lilly Library.

- Miranda Cooper writes for Tablet Magazine about "500 Years of Treasures from Oxford," an exhibition now on display at the Center for Jewish History.

- Tom Hyry highlights the current Houghton Library exhibition, "Open House 75: Houghton Staff Select."

- A few early bookplates from Princeton's collections are featured on the Graphic Arts blog.

- At Medieval Manuscripts Provenance, notes on an NYPL breviary fragment.

- Abbie Weinberg marked the 400th birthday of Elias Ashmole with a Collation post.

- Thirty-three books stolen from Jewish communities were donated to the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Warsaw last week.

Book Reviews

- Charlie English's The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu; review by Justin Marozzi in the Spectator.

- Holger Hoock's Scars of Independence; review by Jane Kamensky in the NYTimes.

- James Barron's The One-Cent Magenta; review by Rebecca Rego Barry at the Fine Books Blog.

- John Grisham's Camino Island; review by Jocelyn McClurg in USA Today (apparently it's about rare book and manuscript collecting ... )

- Beth Underdown's The Witchfinder's Sister; review by Helen Castor in the NYTimes.

- Rüdiger Safranski's Goethe: Life as a Work of Art; review by Michael Dirda in the WaPo.

- Stephen Fry's new audiobook edition of the Sherlock Holmes stories; review by Simon Callow in the NYTimes.

Upcoming Auctions

The Richard Beagle Collection of Angling and Sporting Books, Part I on 1 June at PBA Galleries.

Arader Galleries Summer 2017 Sale on 3 June.

Books and Ephemera at National Book Auctions on 3 June.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Links & Reviews

- From the Globe and Mail, a profile of Alberto Manguel in his new role as director of Argentina's national library.

- An 800-word Harry Potter prequel written by J. K. Rowling and sold for charity in 2008 was stolen from Birmingham last month.

- The BBC reported this week on the identification of an early Caxton leaf at the University of Reading.

- Rebeccca Rego Barry writes for the Fine Books Blog about Maggs Bros. new headquarters, which will open on 24 May.

- Ruth Guilding has a "First Person" profile of T. J. Cobden-Sanderson for the TLS.

- Alex Preston writes for the Observer on "How real books have trumped ebooks," drawing on several recent studies showing a recent increase in print book sales.

- Another security alert from the ABAA, for a copy of Steele's Essay upon Gardening (1793) believed stolen from the New York Book Fair.

- Lloyd Cotsen, known for his collection of children's books which now form the Cotsen Children's Library at Princeton, died this week at age 88. See the LATimes obituary.

- A new digital archive, Early American Serialized Novels, is now available.

- Christopher Lancette writes for the Fine Books Blog about his visit to the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair, and about rediscovering a love for his own library.

- Dalya Alberge writes for the Guardian about the forged Dylan artwork mentioned here last month.

- Elizabeth Yale's piece in the Atlantic on the new film "The Circle" asks "how can the past be used to reimagine women’s technological agency?"

Reviews

- John Boles' Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty; review by Jonathan Yardley in the WaPo.

- Matthew Rubery's The Untold Story of the Talking Book; review by Matthew P. Brown for Public Books.

Upcoming Auctions

- 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries on 16 May.

- Rare Books, Manuscripts, Maps & Photographs at Lyon & Turnbull on 17 May.

- Fine Literature & Fine Books at PBA Galleries on 18 May.

- Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Continental and Russian Books and Musical Manuscripts at Sotheby's London on 23 May.

Sunday, May 07, 2017

Links & Reviews

Apologies for the radio silence; it's been a busy month. As I mentioned previously, I traveled to the Florida Antiquarian Book Fair two weekends ago and to the Washington Antiquarian Book Fair last weekend; both were excellent events with good, vibrant crowds.

- Garrett Scott has a really touching "In Memoriam" post on the ABAA blog about Robert Fraker of Savoy Books, who died this week after a battle with cancer. I remember well Robert's wonderful talk at the 2012 AAS event Garrett mentions. About ten years ago at the Boston Book Fair, Robert sold me one of the items I'm most pleased to have in my own collection, and consistently since then he's had something to show me at the fair that he knew would make my mouth water and/or that I would want to help find a home for. Visiting him and his wife Lillian at their booth has long been a highlight of the fair for me. My deep, deep condolences to Lillian, his family, and his colleagues, and thanks to Garrett for his lovely post.

- Entries for this year's National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest are now being accepted; they are due by 31 May.

- May's Rare Book Monthly articles include Michael Stillman on a stolen library book returning to the shelves and a report on the BPL's rare books inventory.

- Serial book thief Laéssio Rodrigues de Oliveira and an accomplice, Valnique Bueno, are suspected in the theft of more than four hundred rare books from the Rio de Janeiro Federal University in Brazil during a construction project. Via Mitch Fraas, a longer article about the thefts, in Portuguese, includes a list of the stolen titles.

- A list of stolen maps and engravings has been posted over on the ABAA blog, as has the description of a copy of Paine's Common Sense stolen by fraud to someone in Los Angeles and two more books stolen in the New England area in mid-April.

- Princeton has acquired a vellum fragment of a Gutenberg Bible preserved as a binding. Eric White has an excellent writeup.

- Lisa Fagin Davis has a thorough post on the manuscript recently returned by the Boston Public Library to the Italian government. More via the Fine Books Blog and the Boston Globe.

- The Harry Ransom Center has acquired the archive of Peter O'Toole for $400,000.

- The earliest known draft of a portion of the King James Bible, identified at Cambridge in 2015, has now been digitized and published in the Cambridge Digital Library.

- Joe Felcone talked to Wendi Maloney for an LC blog post about his work with 19th-century copyright records.

- A 13th-century manuscript stolen from a Turkish library was identified in a Sotheby's auction catalog withdrawn from sale, according to Turkish media reports.

- Fascinating post by conservator Kristi Westberg for the Huntington blog about "Preserving the Signs of Censorship."

- Adam Reinherz goes inside the Caliban Books warehouse for the Jewish Chronicle.

- The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has acquired an important collection of early Virginia maps.

- In the New Yorker, "How to Decode an Ancient Roman's Handwriting."

- Two new digital collections from the Library of Congress are now available: Manuscripts from St. Catherine's Monastery and the Margaret Bayard Smith papers.

- A manuscript copy on parchment of the Declaration of Independence in the West Sussex Record Office, while long cataloged, is being studied closely for the first time by researchers for the Declaration Resources Project; they have concluded it probably dates to the 1780s. Coverage in the NYTimes and Phys.org.

- Rebecca Romney looks at thirty years of cover designs for The Handmaid's Tale.

- Nicholas Pickwoad's obituary of Christopher Clarkson appeared in the Guardian.

- Lauren Hewes has posted a second installment of photographs showing printers at work, from the AAS collections.

- Cambridge (MA) bookseller and bookbinder Robert Marshall died on 9 April; an obituary appeared in the Boston Globe.

- From Mike Furlough, "What Libraries Did With Google Books," based in part on James Somers' Atlantic piece "Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria."

- Over at Manuscript Road Trip, a stop in New Bedford to look at an important and understudied Book of Hours in the New Bedford Public Library.

- More Shakespeare's World finds for the OED.

- Among the scholarships available for this year's CABS is the new Belle da Costa Greene Scholarship for a bookseller or librarian from an underrepresented community.

- A new book has been published to mark the Houghton Library's 75th birthday. Looks like a good one! More on the anniversary celebrations here.

- Swann sold a complete copy of The Cherokee Messenger on 27 April; it fetched $4,500.

- New: a University of Surrey project, Women's Literary Culture before the Conquest.

- The UVA Law Library has received a grant to digitize copies of the books Jefferson included in his original selection of law texts for the university.

- Robert Oldham writes for the APHA blog about Adam Ramage's one-pull common press.

- The State Library of Massachusetts blog has a post on the history and travels of the manuscript of William Bradford's Of Plimoth Plantation.

Reviews

- John Julius Norwich's Four Princes; review by Alan Mikhail in the NYTimes.

- Peter Brooks' Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris; review by Sunil Iyengar in the WaPo.

- Beth Underdown's The Witchfinder's Sister; review by Carrie Dunsmore in the WaPo.

- Helena Kelly's Jane Austen, the Secret Radical; review by Ruth Franklin in the WaPo.

- Jeff Vandermeer's Borne; review by Elizabeth Hand in the LATimes.

- Charlie English's The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu; review by Peter Thoneman in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Travels, Atlases, Maps & Natural History at Sotheby's London on 9 May.

- Printed Books, Maps & Documents at Dominic Winters Auctioneers on 10 May.

- Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions on 11 May.

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Links & Reviews

- Christela Guerra reports for the Boston Globe about current effort at the BPL to get a full inventory of the rare books and manuscripts in their collections.

- From John Garcia at JHIBlog, "The Other Samuel Johnson: African-American Labor in the Vicinity of the Early U.S. Book Trade."

- Over at The Pressbengel Project, making parchment out of salmon skin.

- Humanities magazine has an interview with library historian Wayne Wiegand.

- Maria Sibylla Merian is the featured subject at Echoes from the Vault.

- The NEH Impact Index is well worth spending some time with.

- Lisa Fagin Davis posts at Manuscript Road Trip about Otto Ege and the Lima (OH) Public Library.

- Jennifer Schuessler reports for the NYTimes on the James Baldwin archive, newly purchased by the Schomburg Center but some of which will remain closed to researchers for twenty more years.

- Scott Rosenberg writes for Backchannel on "How Google Book Search Got Lost."

- AAS has a podcast interview with Ezra Greenspan about his work on Frederick Douglass, editing Book History, and more.

- More on that archive of Sylvia Plath letters mentioned last month from Sylvia Plath Info and the Guardian.

- In the Irish Times, a story about a library theft that has inspired a new children's book.

- The British Library has announced a major expansion plan.

Reviews

- The Card Catalog, a new Library of Congress publication; review by Rebecca Rego Barry for the Fine Books Blog.

- Lyndal Roper's Martin Luther; review by Andrew Pettegree in the NYTimes.

- Brian Doyle's The Adventures of John Carson in Several Quarters of the World; review by Jenny Davidson in the NYTimes.

- Shelley DeWees' Not Just Jane; review by Caroline Franklin in the TLS.

Upcoming Auctions

- Images & Objects: Photographs & Photobooks at Swann on 20 April.

- Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Directories - Cartography at PBA Galleries on 20 April.

- The Maurice Neville Collection of Modern Literature (Part III) at Sotheby's New York on 24 April.

- Rare Books, Autographs & Maps at Doyle on 26 April [includes books deaccessioned from the College of New Rochelle].

- The Giancarlo Beltrame Library of Scientific Books (Part III) at Christie's London on 26 April.

- Printed & Manuscript Americana at Swann on 27 April.

- The Library of the Late Hubert Dingwall at Bloomsbury on 27 April.